Book Publicity the Easy Way

Has your book won an award? Make the most of it by letting people know this through publicity. It ‘s not just for awards; any honors or favorable mentions by other organizations are cause for your publicity. Books only have 4 months in which they are considered new. That is why many of the business writers put out at least one book a year. If you have reached the top of the bestseller list, putting out books more often is a good idea. If you have reached the bestseller list, you will want to wait before putting out the new book, so that you do not knock your own book off the Top of the list.

I have talked to many business owners who have won awards or their book has been honored and they never bothered to do their own publicity about it. You have to blow your own horn. You can hire someone or delegate someone in the office to do it, but it’s a task that must be done. Being an Amazon best seller is to be noted on your bio also. It helps to have a large following for your book and good sales but it is not required. You could assign an assistant to research appropriate book contests for your book. By reading other book press releases before you book comes out you can begin to make a list. You will have to send them books. This needs to be added to your marketing budget. This is why I say publicity is marketing cousin. Both of them need to have a budget in your business. Once your award is won, contact your local paper to let them know. They love their hometown people and want to write about good news from their own community. The smaller the town, the better chance you have at getting an article written. Be sure to mention where they can get the book locally. You will have the local independent books shops happily displaying your book and even the article because they too are mentioned it in. The chain retail stores only display books they are paid extra to display. If you have a good relationship with the manager, you may get them on board. It never hurts to ask.

The award should be added to your bio and book description. Get the logos that represent the award and add them to your website. Make the most of any honors you receive about your book.

Book Marketing 101- Book Publicity for Authors — Creating a Book Publicity Campaign

Publicity is that elusive thing that can make or break your book – in all sorts of ways! Learning to promote you and your book is something that can take a bit of “re-training” for most new authors (and many old-timers too). Publicity is really all about selling your idea (and you), but all too often the word “selling” brings up images of polyester clad used-car salesmen, telemarketers, and strong-arm sales strategies that do nothing but alienate your intended customer.

Nothing could be further from the truth.

True “salesmanship” is all about creating a deep connection with your intended reader or reviewer by providing unique, useful and rewarding information about your book. It’s all about creating a relationship that you will both benefit from and to which you can return time and again. It’s about creating the awareness that you are an EXPERT about the topic of your book.

Good publicity is also regular and consistent publicity – there really is no such thing as an overnight success. Remember that you never know who is reading or listening — it just might have been someone who could lead you to bigger and better things.

Here’s some ways to create a great relationship with the editors and reporters that can provide your book the long term exposure it needs to succeed:

1) It’s ALL about your intended audience – and very little about you. You might be brilliant, but the editor only cares about their audience. As a matter of fact, more often than not if you come across as thinking you are too wonderful, you’ll most likely turn out to be a turn off to the editor or reporter. This is where “blanket” press releases that go to thousands of outlets fail – they typically focus on you the author, and unless you are already a household name, guess what? No one cares.

You MUST tailor your release to the intended audience – and it must be unique. Focus on the benefits you will provide their audience. Think about the publication or program you are trying to approach – what do they provide to their audience and does your book contribute to their goals? Don’t under any circumstances make your pitch sound like an ad for your book – if you have a good fit, and have good information inside your book, then it will generate interest in the book. The goal here is to make the editors, reporters, and audience understand that you are an expert on your topic, and that your book contains lots of good information – by PRESENTING some of the information… not by TELLING them you are an expert.

2) Target your pitch. Be confident knowing that reporters and editors have lots of need for information. But also understand the one of the quickest ways to get rejected is to pitch the wrong person – you’ll waste both of your time (and probably annoy the editor or reporter) – do you homework and find out who is the correct contact for your book. Once you’ve found the right person – ask them what they want. Only pitch your idea if it’s a fit. Be sure to respect his or her time – everyone in the media industry works on unbelievably tight deadlines. Ask if they are under a deadline and if so, could you call back at a better time.

Be short, sweet, and to the point – which means get to the point quickly. The audience will eventually want more detail than the reporter or editor – but for your reviewer, be able to sum up your book in 30 seconds or less. “Talk less, listen more” – let the editor or reporter drive the conversation after you have them interested. They will have specific needs and questions – so stop talking and answer them explicitly.

3) Approach ALL types and sizes of publications and media. Don’t be afraid to contact the “big guys” and don’t neglect the smaller ones. Any one in the media has to aggressively pursue getting new and fresh content for their shows, magazines, and newspapers. This is especially true of anyone who needs to fill space on a daily basis. They are almost always on the search for people who can present information on exciting and interesting topics and trends. The biggest outlets are always on the search for an unknown that they can highlight.

The smaller journals and outlets often have a very focused and influential audience – and you never know who might be reading them or listening to their show . The smaller publications can also be “gateways” into the larger ones . Almost every single size of publication has value in your publicity campaign. Your chances of getting into smaller publications is probably higher than the larger ones, so set your time and effort accordingly.

4) Treat your contacts with unfailing respect and politeness. Yes, you are very busy – you might even be far busier than the publicist or producer that you are trying to approach. But you need them to help you out – and being constantly aware that they are very busy themselves will keep you focused on getting your materials to them in a timely manner. Never ever be late in submitting materials for a review or interview.

5) Understand that publicity isn’t a “one shot success” effort. It is all about sustained and consistent awareness of your product. Marketing research indicates that a consumer will need to see your name about 7 times before they will remember it. Try to keep your interviews and reviews spaced out a little bit – frequency and consistency are critical. Don’t ever let up on your publicity campaigns – even the most successful product lines in the world (think Nike and McDonalds) continue to consistently spend millions on awareness campaigns for their products. Very rarely is anyone an “overnight success” – even the best-selling authors spent years building their reputations.

Follow these 5 steps while conducting your publicity campaigns, and your level of success will be far greater than those who have either ignored or never learned these basic steps.

If you like this information (and found it helpful) please feel free to post it on your site, put it in a blog, toss it in your newsletter, or in general spread it around. Please just give us credit here at www.dogearpublishing.net

May you have success in your creative efforts!

10 Key Strategies For a Good Book Publicity Campaign

Below I have listed 10 strategies you can use to jump start a good book publicity campaign.

Contact the press immediately if your topic is making headlines. Ask not have not. You’d be surprised how many times you will be taken up on your offer to participate as an expert for an article or news story when you just ask.

Host your own radio show. This is easier than it sounds. Blog talk radio is an excellent starting point for getting a radio show off the ground. Your show can be talk radio where you interview people who have stories or information related to the topic of your book. Or, you can come up with 15 minute messages related to topics in your book.

Start your own free local cable access television show. This too is easy and every major city should have the resources to help you with this endeavor

Speak for local civic groups and announce in their newsletters. You may even want to have a fundraiser or donate some of the proceeds from your book to their causes.

Write and send press releases regularly. If this is something you are not familiar with, there are many valuable resources on the internet that can help you develop a good press release. Once written, you will want to send it to the many free press release companies online. You will also want to send the releases to local media.

Write articles for newspapers and magazines. Again you’d be surprised how receptive these audiences can be. Magazines and newspapers are always looking for well written articles that address issues of concern to them.

Call in to talk shows and participate in their discussions. This gives listeners insight into your persona. It is a great tool for building a following.

Contact radio shows and television shows and suggest stories in your area of expertise. The first time I did this I landed a guest spot on a local television show on a major network.

Add media contacts to your newsletter distribution list. Content from your newsletter may lead to an appearance on a show or an invite to be a guest columnist

Monitor writers forums for source requests. Writer’s forums are a great place to learn about opportunities in your field.

The key is not to be afraid and to move forward with determination. It will pay off in the long run.

Cheryl Lacey-Donovan is an author, educator, and inspirational speaker. Cheryl is also the host of Worth More Than Rubies an internet radio talk show that airs on blogtalkradio.com. She has been a mentor for Christian Women Today for one year and is the founder of Imani Enterprises Unlimited.

The Way to Successful Book Publicity Campaigns

An effective and affordable book publicity campaign is one thing that can determine the success of your book. However, most experts also claim that it is definitely not that easy to achieve. For many first-time authors, and even those who are already old-timers, the promotion of a published book is something that can require a little bit of training.

When it comes to publicity, what image comes to your mind? To be sure, images of pushy salesmen in tweed suits and aggressive telemarketers are no longer relevant. With the evolution of book publishing, the concept of book marketing services has also reached a turning point. At present and in essence, publicity is really all about selling yourself and your product in a way that will attract consumers and not turn them off. Here are some ways that you can give your book the appropriate and long-lasting exposure that it needs.

Focus on your target audience. Contrary to what you might think, most journalists care very little about authors, not unless you are a very famous and successful one. What is important to them is their audience. Therefore, for you to make the most impact on these journalists and their audiences, you must make it a point to tailor your press releases to the kind of audience which you hope to reach.

Make sure that you get in touch with the right person, to avoid wasting time-yours and that of the editor or journalist that you contact. Keep in mind that most in the media industry have hectic schedules, so you need to be appreciative and mindful of their time. Be direct to the point when you make your pitch and make sure you answer succinctly any questions they might have.

To advertise a book, it is preferable that you take advantage of all possible media channels and publications. If you are to get the most exposure for your book, you must not be afraid to approach the big media firms as well as the lesser known ones. The bigger outlets are usually looking for unknown talents that they can discover and highlight, and the smaller ones usually have a smaller yet influential and focused audience.

Do not forget to give all of your contacts the respect and consideration that they deserve, no matter how busy you are. Remember that these people also have busy schedules and what they are basically doing is helping you out in your campaign. Therefore, be punctual when you have appointments and make sure you submit you submit your materials to them on time.

Remember that obtaining publicity for your book is not likely to be a one-shot effort. You can’t have everything you wished for in just one try. You may have to wait a very long time or make certain changes to your campaign a few times before you can see results. Be patient and work hard on your campaign.

In the end, there is actually no guarantee to success in the book publishing world. Following the above steps, however, ensures that you are closer to it than most people who approach book marketing haphazardly.

Sending Books As Part Of Your Book Publicity Efforts

Book PR is not rocket science, but experience and knowledge definitely do wonders. Many authors choose to do their own book publicity and in doing so, they resort to simply sending out mass mailings and emails.

Yes, sending out your book (AKA a galley) is definitely an effective way to get the word out on your book. However, countless authors and publishers are faced with budgetary constraints and cannot afford to send hundreds of galleys blindly in hopes of reviews and mentions in the media.

The challenge is not entirely about how many books to send, but to whom to send the galleys to, how and even when– as media contact knowledge and timing is everything. This is one reason why a caring, quality book publicist is an asset–but not a requirement

How does one decide how many galleys to send to media?

Some larger, established publishing houses send out hundreds of sets of galleys while small publishers and authors send– let’s say, fifty in total. Although sending as many galleys as possible seems like the best option, large budget or not– the money you spend doing so is always a factor. This is when expertise is very beneficial. You see, when a public relations firm comes into play, they usually will know best due to their experience with contacts’ preferences and past habits. They can work within your budget (large or small) to maximize your mailings’ outcome.

Sometimes media contacts don’t even need to receive a galley. It depends. A press release sent via fax with a solid pitch can suffice… at other times, an EPK and an emailed pitch can do the trick. Or if you know the contact well enough, or feel confident that your pitch is all someone needs to hear–go ahead and make the call! My experience has told me however, that book reviewers want something to read.

It all depends on the contact’s needs–and a book publicist can know all about them. Publicists really do have an upper hand. One step further, PR firms know the right contacts who will review your book. Sending a galley, no matter how great it is, will not get your book featured if you’re sending the galley to the wrong editor. PR firms have extensive databases with notes that will help them not only locate the right contact, but pinpoint when and how to contact these specific individuals.

You don’t have to have a publicist, book publicity can be done on your own–it just depends on your needs, goals, time constraints, patience, talent and preferences. If you decide to go at it alone–perhaps consider a book PR consultant for an hour. The advice you get will save you more time and money than the cost of the consultation. Whether you choose to reach out for help or not, do yourself the favor and take the time to do your homework. It is well worth the effort in the end.

Use the 3C’s to Gain Book Publicity

Relentless Book Promotion: 3 C’s of a Book Publicity Campaign:

You’ve written your book, now what? You are an author: TRUE! But, you are now also a book promoter! That is the BOLD truth that you need to understand. As an author handling your own PR Campaign, PR success can be obtained. Here are 3 ways to ensure exposure and credibility with your PR efforts. I like to call them the 3 C’s of a Book Publicity Campaign:

Consistency – Having between one and two media appearances (radio show, TV or print) will NOT skyrocket your book to a best sellers list. As an author responsible for your own PR efforts, it will take more than a few appearances. It takes months and consistent publicity to have your media outreach efforts payoff; sometimes even longer. But, you must stick with it and be consistent. A lot of times when you see authors make appearances on major shows like the Oprah Show, Regis & Kelli & GMA; that buzz started regionally. It is critical to build the buzz around you, your hometown and then regional/statewide.
Covet local press – There are some golden opportunities to covet your local and regional press. Do not make the mistake of overlooking this opportunity. Authors all want that coveted title “New York Times Best Sellers” status. But, often times, that happens due to the local buzz and local support of regional media. People will love to cheer for you and your book success. If you get coverage, your hometown or state gets coverage too. It’s nostalgic and heart-warming for the town, the state and the author. Covet the local press and do not count them out. Both have nationwide reach.
Creative Pitch – Does your book have a current event theme? Can it be related to a business scenario currently happening in the news? What’s in the news? Be sure you know what reporters, journalists and the media is talking about BEFORE you call to pitch a story to them. For example, if your book is on “Surviving Divorce”, perhaps you pitch a story to the media during Valentine’s Day about “Four ways to love your way through divorce”. This creativity can certainly land you in the news, as most of the stories will be about “love, finding your mate, celebrating love…etc. A lot of times, the media needs a twist on a story…make it creative. Make it relevant, before you pitch.

CONGRATS on your PR efforts! Implementing these 3 C’s above will add value to your campaign approach.

You have permission to reprint this article with this required author credit:

Antoinette Sykes offers a free Book Success eZine at www.TCBoutik.com [http://www.TCBoutik.com/]. She also offers consulting and holds Book Publicity events. About Author: Antoinette Sykes is a PR expert, speaker and coach operating a boutique PR agency that focuses on authors and event PR.

TC Boutik offers a unique marketing and PR service for authors and writers that is sure to garner maximum exposure and ultimately sell books! TC Boutik is with you from the onset to assist you getting the word out. We offer strategies to help you build your fan following and readership; while strategically aligning you with the media, audience, and others who want to know more about your message and your book

7 Book Publicity Tips for Authors and Small Publishers

The biggest mistake authors make when trying to get free publicity is pitching either themselves or their books.

Don’t pitch authors! Pitch issues. Don’t pitch books! Pitch entire shows.

Example: If you wrote a book about how children of divorced parents suffer long-term effects well into adulthood, don’t try to entice TV producers with the book. Entice them with an entire show around the topic of “Children of divorced parents: Do they ever recover?” Then suggest two or three other guests who tie into your topic and could be interviewed, preferably someone who is on the other side of the issue. If you can do that, you’ve just given producers an idea for an entire show, and they’re more likely to bite because you’ve done their work for them.

Here are 6 more book publicity tips:

–Be sure you have a good quality professional photo of yourself. I’m amazed at the number of authors I write stories about who don’t have photos I can use.

–Use a “tip sheet” in your media kit that ties into your topic. Example: You write a book about how to discipline children. Your tip sheet might be something like “9 Tips for Calming Your Child’s Temper Tantrum.” Each tip should be no longer than one or two short sentences. The media love these tips because they can reprint them as a sidebar to a longer story. See Special Report #16: How to Write Tip Sheets That Catch the Media’s Attention

–If you have a website, place the author’s photo and updated contact information at the site. Sometimes when trying to contact an author, I go to their website and then search in desperation for contact info.

–Don’t be afraid of controversy when it comes to book promotion. The more controversial you are willing to be, the greater your chances of coverage by the media, particularly broadcast. Radio shows in particular don’t want only light. They want heat.

–The author should write an opinion column taking a strong stand on one side of a controversial issue that ties into the topic of the book. Then target the column to the publication that is read by people who you want to buy your book.

–If you want to get into a particular publication, call the advertising department and ask for a copy of their free Editorial Calendar. This is a listing of all special sections and topics planned for the year. Review the calendar and find a specific issue where your topic would be a good fit. Then call the publication, ask for the name of the person who edits that section, and write or e-mail them with your story idea. Do this several months before the publication is printed.

Most importantly, unless you are contacting the book reviewer, most media people don’t care what’s between the covers of your book. They DO care about what’s inside your head, your expertise, and how you can help them. Remember that, and you’re well on your way to lots of free publicity.

3 Steps to Gaining Book Publicity for Independent Publishers

Self-publishing a book might be a hard nut to crack but it is not impossible. It requires a lot of time and effort on your part, but then, doesn’t everything successful does? Whether you take the traditional route to publishing or decide to self-publish a book, marketing and book publicity is in your hands. It doesn’t get any easier either way for aspiring authors, but self-publishing offers more pros than cons, provided you are dedicated to make it up the success ladder.

Let’s find out how to gain publicity for your book as an independent publisher:

1. Find Your Audience

You’ve written a book, great. Have you found your audience or has it found your book to give it the air it needs? Most first time authors feel dejected because of low sales or not being able to attract the right audience for their books. The question is: are you targeting the right audience at the right place? Today, social media plays a big role in marketing and publicity and you should choose the right channels to market your book and find out where your target audience resides in the online world, to get their attention.

2. Strategize your Online Publicity Campaign

Online publicity has evolved lot more than what it was a couple of years ago. Today, you need to engage your audience, which can be particularly critical when you are just starting out. Map out your online publicity campaign and make sure you follow it through. A few posts on a few social media channels will not do the job. Pitch for reviews, offer giveaways, and hand out free book samples and guest book blogs at other sites.

Remember that it’s a long road but not one that you can’t travel. Once at the end of your journey, you will realize how much you have learned, and find better ways to market your subsequent books.

3.Get Connected

As you are starting out, you may want to balance your professional and personal character. The idea is that you also need to get connected to your audience and prospective readers on a personal level. Be available and share your personal thoughts on your social media channels. When readers feel that a new author cares for his readers, it is more likely that they will be interested in reading your work. Many online book publishing companies help self-publishers to publish and design their books using their free tools.

If you aspire to become an author and earn fame, remember that it’s a lonely road to the top, but one that you shouldn’t mind taking. Book publicity is critical to selling your book, and when selecting an online publisher, you must choose carefully. For instance, check out instantpublisher.com. They help their authors by listing the first 20 pages of their book on a website, which is frequently visited by publishing companies and book brokers. Who knows you might just land a deal?

Book Publicity – How to Create an Online Media Kit

In your author and book publicity activities, it’s critical to make it easy for journalists, talk show producers and other influencers to quickly find everything they need to know about you and your book. One of the best ways to do that is to create a page for the media on your website and blog.

Online author and book publicity pages are called by several names, including media room, media kit, press room or press kit, or they are simply labeled as Media or Press on the site’s navigation menu. On some sites, the media page is accessed through a link from the About page of the site. Whatever you call your book publicity page, just make sure it’s clearly marked and easy to find from any page on your site.

Remember, your media page isn’t just for the media – it’s a great place to showcase your credentials and biographic information for a variety of author and book publicity purposes. For example, you can link to your media page when introducing yourself to bloggers, potential clients and potential partners.

Sandra Beckwith, a former award-winning publicist who now teaches authors how to generate media attention, advises imagining what questions journalists would ask about you and your book and making sure they can find the answers to those questions in your media room. “You want to make sure you’re providing the information they want in a format they’re familiar with,” she says. “That means you want to present that information in a factual way without hyperbole or exaggeration.”

Here are some of the most important elements to include on your book publicity page:

• About the Author – You might create two bios, a short one of about three sentences (imagine a radio announcer introducing you) and another bio about half a page long.

• About the Book – Summary of your book, written in a news style without marketing hype.

• Praise/Endorsements/Reviews – Feature any celebrity quotes prominently.

• Awards – Book awards and awards received by the author.

• Author Photos – High resolution version for print and low resolution for online use. Include a caption beneath your photo listing your credentials or author tagline.

• Book Covers – High resolution for print and low resolution for online use.

• Contact Information – Make this easy to find, include email address, phone number, and address if applicable.

Other elements commonly found on author and book publicity pages include:

• Complete Press Kit – One page or document containing all of your media information in one place.

• In the Media – Provide links to previous media coverage that you’ve received. If you have appeared in any major print or broadcast media, include their logos prominently on your media page.

• Audio and/or Video Clips – Short audio or video clips of you (preferably being interviewed) allow potential interviewers to hear or see you in action.

• Interview Topics – A list of topics you can speak about.

• Sample Q & A – Radio stations, in particular, will appreciate using questions you provide for an interview

• Article Topics – A list of topics you can write about and/or suggested angles for feature stories about you. You might even provide pre-written stories or tips for the media to use.

• Fact Sheet – One-page document with pertinent facts about your industry or book topic.

• Press Releases – Links to online versions of press releases about you, your book or business.

• Media References – Nice quotes from media who have interviewed you or worked with you.

• Clients Include – If you’re a consultant, you might want to post a list of important clients (with their permission) and a few testimonial quotes from clients.

Many online book publicity pages contain downloadable documents in PDF format, but Sandra Beckwith advises just putting the text of your media materials on a web page and letting people copy and paste from there. Even when it’s convenient to copy or download your book publicity materials from your website, some people will still want you to email information to them or even send a printed media kit.

Your online author publicity page is a great promotional tool. If you don’t already have a media page on your site, get started now – you can always add to it over time. If you do have a media page, now is a good time to review and enhance it.